Jimmy and Enrique in the Moment

There is a dirty-little-not-so-secret here at TGH. Green (that’s me!) doesn’t actually PLAY an instrument.

 

Well, I have played in the past. I took lessons on viola, violin, and piano, and sing off and on in church choirs. But I’m not a “real” musician. I’m the writer in the group. So even though I love listening to all kinds of music, I have only reviewed albums with vocals. I can talk about lyrics. And talk. But there are a lot of wonderful instrumental albums out there. Having half the website be an amazing musician makes me realize I’m missing a lot in my word-centric world.

 

I had to find a way to write about music my way. I feel like the old guy using the kids’ slang talking about gigs and licks and shredding guitars–or is it shredding music on guitars? Anyway, I usually focus on the poetry of lyrics and the overall feel of the music. Today, I decided to take on one album that is a wordless wonder: In the Moment by Jimmy and Enrique. Jimmy and Enrique are friends and colleagues of Hen, so that’s our full disclosure. In spite of that possible handicap, their album has me dancing in my seat as I type. The album has a strong Latin sound, and mixes all kinds of other influences.

 

Latin music has roots in a lot of different cultures. The guitar itself, recognized as a major instrument in Spanish and Latin music, descends from the Persian tar, a lute-like instrument named for the Persian word for “string.” Or so I’m told by Wikipedia. The troubadours, the original touring bands, have been connected to William of Aquitane and his influence from Muslim prisoners he captured on a crusade. Troubadour music highlighted loves lost and gained, amorous conquests, and evidently ribald poetry. The gyrating rhythms in Spanish, Latin, and Arab music are all perfect accompaniment for such subject matter. Jimmy and Enrique manage to get a lot of feeling across without needing words, which I guess is what great musicians do.

 

After listening to the album for the first time, I read another review. I was terribly pleased with myself to have noticed the Middle Eastern and of course, Latin influences in the music. Looking at the album now, I realize the song titles would have provided context clues. I dare you to listen to this album and sit still. Here are some highlights:

 

“Las Dos Vidoras” (“The Two Vipers”) is, well. . .serpentine. If a couple of snakes decided to start a flamenco, this is the song they would want as background. I can’t listen to it without trying to do a little “S” wiggle with my spine. Good luck managing better than me.

 

“Sandstorm” started and my first image was a camel ride with dervishes whirling around a caravan. That was before I checked the title of the song. So J&E have done a masterful job evoking the feel of the desert. I want some Morroccan tea, which I have now discovered is much more complex than it looks. Not unlike most music, but especially the subtle layers throughout this album.

 

As we continue our world-tour-in-an-album, we come to “Calypso Coronado.” Since I’m not a California girl, I did not recognize the (possible?) reference to Coronado, CA. The calypso feel, however, came through loud and clear.

 

“Chocolate Eyes” has a smooth sound. I hear a little island, a little jazz, a little Latin, and a little sitting on a veranda with a microbrew and enjoying life. And dancing. Definitely dancing.

 

J&E are some of the best musicians in San Diego. Jimmy Patton is a top-class guitarist, currently signed with Pacific Records. He is acknowledged as one of the best guitarists in the country, and has opened for jazz greats Stanley Jordan and Terrance Blanchard. Enrique Platas is a world-renowned drummer and percussionist. He has played on albums from Sony Mexico, and has opened for the B-52s and trumpeter Chris Botti.

 

You can buy In the Moment on their website.

 

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