Die Where I Began–The Unusually Traditional Will Overman Band

Will Overman Band

Since I started writing for That Green Hen, I’ve been amazed at how much quality music I’ve missed as a “radio girl.” My internet cohort, Hen, has been part of the local music scene on the West Coast for years, so he should have told me what I was missing, but NOOOOO, he kept it all to himself.

Now I love discovering new music, and one of these days I’m going to shed my inner Emily Dickinson and go off and visit some of these groups in person. The Will Overman Band is one of the great groups I’ve never heard until now. Here are my thoughts on their latest album, Die Where I Began.

The album is a nice mix of bluegrass-tinged americana and folk, expected themes and interesting twists. I especially love the cultural references worked into the songs, and the unusual topics handled creatively. There are not many songs about sitting in a hospital room, or being the one to break someone’s heart. And not many homages to a place that compare a street singer to Kurt Vonnegut. Will Overman Band goes to all these places, and does them with a touching skill that will send me searching for all their previous work.

A quick run-through of songs:

Whipporwill: True to bluegrass tradition, “Whipporwill” gives you all the banjos and fiddles you could want. The image of “licking my pen and writing these words about you” puts you back in time. The references to the natural world harken to any number of old songs that have come down out of the mountains.  Songs where love is best expressed as “the wind that cools you down when I’m not around” in a “song as long as the song of a whipporwill”.

Fix My Girl:  A song about waiting in the hospital room of a loved one. It catches the desperate tenderness you feel in a sterile hospital. “White wristband turning, strumming my new song. . .” while being willing to take her place if there was any way to trade places. If you’ve ever spent time sitting by a bed in a “hospital with its poker faced rooms,” this song will resonate with you. And probably make you cry. My favorite song on the album.

Minnesota I Was Wrong: For me, this song is made by the line: “the moon’s eerie beckoning is a broken-hearted dusk.” It’s just one of the great lines the pop up in this album.

Take Me Back to Virginia: I’m morally obligated to like this song, since I’m from Richmond. The band hits everything you’d expect about Virginia, and touches on our great education tradition, too, with references to Kurt Vonnegut, comparing him to a street performer who smells like “mustard gas and rose.” They hit the blue sky, the James River, dogwoods, freshly-turned fields, hills, and of course, in that Southern Gothic tradition made famous by Edgar Allen Poe, death gets a mention, too.

Falling In and Out: It’s not that often you find a song from the heartbreaker’s viewpoint. “Falling In and Out” is for those who spoke first, then reconsidered. The music is tender and sad, and Overman gets just the right amount of wistful tears into his voice to make you feel sorry for the one who walks away.

I Miss You: It’s appropriate that this song should follow Falling In and Out. “My lady done left me, but I pushed her along” explains where things stand. “I miss you, my dear,” with a sightly manic banjo accompaniment captures the feeling of sending someone away, knowing they need to go–in this case on a mind-opening travel tour “across this vast world”, yet wanting them back so very very badly. It  has the same feel as “Leaving on a Jet Plane.”

You can follow the Will Overman Band on their Facebook page, and buy their album on iTunes.

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